20th April 2016

Aside of planning the stag do, the most testing part of being a best man is of course the best man speech.

Standing up in front of an audience of the bride and groom’s closest friends and families, there are any number of potential banana skins awaiting the best man on the big day.

To help prepare an entertaining and heartfelt speech, here is our ultimate cheat sheet for best man speech ideas:

Embed Best Man Speech Ideas: The Ultimate Cheat Sheet:

The Introduction

Do:

  • Introduce yourself and who you are in relation to the groom for those who don’t know you.
  • Congratulate the happy couple.
  • Mention how beautiful the bride looks.

Don’t:

  • Open with a joke. Get the formalities done first and save jokes for later. If an opening joke falls flat, it will set the tone for the whole speech.

The Story Of How You Met The Groom

Do:

  • Tell a light hearted tale, potentially with a joke or two if warranted. If how you met wasn’t very interesting, tell a story about something interesting you’ve done together.
  • Have a dig at the groom, but don’t bury him. It is still his day and while everyone can have a laugh at his expense, don’t overdo it.

Don’t:

  • Tell any overly crude jokes or show any overly shocking pictures. Take into account there will be parents and grandparents (and often young kids) present as well as friends.
  • Tell inside jokes. Yes, the groom and maybe a few friends will get a chuckle out if it, but you will alienate the majority of the guests.

The Story Of When The Groom Met His Bride

Do:

  • Tell a short sweet tale with a light sprinkle of embarrassment (on part of the groom). The guests will either find it funny or cute, both are good.
  • Mention how the bride has changed the groom for the better. Make a contrasting point about how the groom was before he met the bride.

Don’t:

  • Take a dig at the bride. The groom is fair game with you as his best man, but the bride is pretty much off limits.
  • Mention controversial topics. This isn’t the time for tales of past girlfriends/boyfriends, or the time they broke up for a week.

The Happy Ending

Do:

  • Thank everyone for coming and the people who have helped put it together, this normally includes the bride’s parents and the bridesmaids.
  • End by making a toast to the happy couple.

Don’t:

  • End on a joke. You have had time for this in the bulk of the speech, now it’s time for sincerity and for rounding off the speech confidently.

Whilst that’s shed some light as to what you should include in your speech, you’ve not aced it until you’ve delivered it:

In Preparation For The Big Day

Do:

  • Research all of your stories to make sure they are accurate by subtly speaking to the bride, groom and anyone else who features.
  • Write the speech down AND learn it. It will appear much more conversational if you’re not reading from a script.
  • Aim for a speech more than 5 minutes but no more than 10.
  • Stay sober. Weddings are a time of celebration but don’t get carried away too early and fluff your big moment.

Don’t:

  • Wing it. Chancing the whole speech is a one-way ticket to naff jokes, potentially offensive comments and ultimately a disappointing performance.
  • Overstay your welcome. Keep your stories short and sweet, don’t go off on lengthy anecdotes and keep to a tight script.

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